A Great 3-Day Itinerary of Singapore

A Great 3-Day Itinerary of Singapore

Trying to really get a feel for a place as well as seeing all of those ‘must see’ sights in just 3 days is a challenge at any destination, especially one with as much going on as Singapore.

That didn’t stop me from trying to come up with the perfect 3-day travel itinerary, taking in everything from the luxury of the Fullerton hotel and the beauty of the waterfront to the impressive botanic gardens and the incredible Buddha Tooth Relic Temple.

Of course, I have also allowed for some shopping in the plan! Read on to see my recommendations for your three-day tour of Singapore. Continue Reading…

Visiting Cup Noodles Museum

Cup Noodles Museum

I felt that my legs were developing varicose veins after a long and excruciating walk to Yamashita Park and its neighboring tourist spots (Red Brick Warehouse, World Porters and Cosmo World — will blog later). So I took a rest and had a refreshing mango drink and sugar rush banana chocolate crepe at World Porters until my Foursquare App sensed that Cup Noodles Museum was just around the corner.

Cup Noodles Museum

There weren’t too many people around, glad I went here on a weekday. I was greeted by the always friendly Japanese staff and assisted me towards the ticketing lady.

Adult Entrance Fee: JPY 500
Elementary school children: JPY 300

Cup Noodles Museum
Instant Noodles History Cube

The Instant Noodles History Cube and Noodles Bazaar were the only attractions open that time. The Momofuku Theater was also open however, for Japanese people or Japanese speaking people only. I was barricaded by the staff of the floor when I attempted to walk in and was told, “Japanese only”

Cup Noodles Museum

Cup Noodles Museum

It was amazing to learn that the first instant noodle was first marketed in 1958 by Taiwanese-Japanese inventor Momofuku Ando produced by Nissin Foods in Japan and there were only 7 variety of instant noodles that time.

Cup Noodles Museum
Our very own Cup noodles and Instant Pancit Canton were also in this museum too!

Cup Noodles Museum

Since there’s not much left to see in the 2nd floor, I proceeded to 4th floor where the Noodles Bazaar was. Basically, it’s like a mini food court but everything is noodles.

Cup Noodles Museum

Cup Noodles Museum
The Cup Noodles Park

Cup Noodles Museum
My Cup Noodles Factory

My favorite part of the tour was the “Make your own Noodles.” I was actually really happy that availed this activity or else it’d be a boring tour as there’s really not much to see in this museum. I paid an additional JPY 300 to experience noodle making.

Cup Noodles Museum

Cup Noodles Museum

The idea wasn’t exactly “making your own noodles,” but to Customize Your Own Cup Noodles. After purchasing my cup from the vending machine and sanitizing, I was assisted by yet another always friendly staff to my seat and joined the other participants in customizing our cups.

Cup Noodles Museum

My Cup Noodles
My original cup noodle!

After doing the art, I was told to stand in line and wait to be called by the noodle maker to put the noodle in my cup. Then, I chose the soup flavor and 3 ingredients for my cup noodles and they sealed it.

Cup Noodles Museum

The last part was wrapping your cup noodles by pumping the air package and your done.

Cup Noodles Museum

Cup Noodles Museum
Souvenir shop

It was already 5:30 p.m. when I finished just before the museum closes. Visiting Cup Noodles museum was one of the main highlights of my Yokohama day tour. The tour is best enjoyed when you’re with friends or your partner. Even though it was fun, something was missing the entire time I visited Cup Noodles museum, I was alone and missed my husband, so time to head back home.

For more information about Cup Noodles Museum, visit their website at: http://www.cupnoodles-museum.jp/english/index.html

Strolling Around Yamashita Park, Yokohama

I didn’t plan to go to Yamashita Park, I ended up being here because I couldn’t find the Yamate Western House on my itinerary. I’m a sucker for finding places on map and meant to be lost.

Yamashita Park, Yokohama

After walking in circles around the Motomachi-Chukagai Station, I decided to rely on street directions and there really wasn’t any direction towards the Yamate Western Houses. I gave up. Instead, went somewhere else and followed the direction to Yamashita Park.

Yamashita Park, Yokohama

Yamashita Park, Yokohama

It was a 15-minute walk from the Motomachi-Chukagai Station. I passed also by the Yokohama Doll Museum and thought of going but I forgot to pull money out from the ATM and 7-11 is no where to be seen around the area. The admission fee was only ¥300.

Yamashita Park, Yokohama

Yamashita Park, Yokohama

Yamashita Park, Yokohama

Hikawa Maru Museum

Hikawa Maru Museum

This ship is actually The Hikawa Maru Museum. It was a Wartime Hospital Ship during 1941 to 1945. Hikawa Maru was damaged several times by mines and even stopped by Davao, Philippines on July 19-26, 1944 to inspect the damage.

Hikawa Maru Museum

Yamashita Park, Yokohama

Yamashita Park, Yokohama

Yamashita Park, Yokohama

Yamashita Park, Yokohama

The Yamashita Park is lovely park that’s great for relaxing and strolling with great views of harbor and a glimpse of the spectacular Minato Mirai [ferris wheel]. Yamashita Park somehow reminded of Avenue of Stars [Hong Kong], only it was better and cleaner.

I was getting hungry and I had to leave this lovely place. I followed the path towards Minato Mirai and got even more surprised of the surroundings. Follow my Yokohama journey on my next post.

A Day in Ueno Park and Zoo

Upon arriving at Ueno Station, the place was already jam-packed with tourists and locals on their way to Ueno Park.

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

I was enchanted when I finally saw cherry blossoms up close and personal. I was surprised that they were not pink. According to Josh, they were not full bloomed yet and not all trees has pink blossoms.

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

Spotted this group of tourist gathered for group picture taking. It seemed that they availed a package tour and were having fun spending their holiday in Japan. I can’t determine their nationality, though some look from Middle East and some from Western Countries.

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

Colorful flowers situated in front of the restroom. They looked fake but they’re real. That’s one of  the amazing things in Japan, trees, flowers, and other plants are very well taken care of.

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

It’s like half of this photo was infrared because of the white blossoms. At the side of the streets, there were picnic blankets which soon occupied by tourists and locals.

Ueno Park Tokyo

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

Me and a better visualization of picnic blankets.

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

Finally saw a tree with pink blossoms. Although, it looked mature and petals be falling off soon.

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

Unlike in Singapore, I noticed that temples in Japan weren’t really that crowded or has few devotees. I then later found that religion isn’t really a practice or self-identification for most Japanese people.
In recent studies, 70% of Japanese people claim that they do not belong to any religion and instead, they enjoy the Freedom of Religion or also known as apostasy (abandonment of the religion by a person).

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo
The other beautiful side of Ueno Park.

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo
Not sure what bird was this, maybe a Japanese bird?

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo
Then the water invited ducks and Japanese cranes.

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

Random people encounter: A dog master. A drunk Japanese guy thrown into the water by his drunk friends. Alcohol drinking in public places is legal in the place during this season.

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

There were also a number of food stalls as we walked, mostly street foods, but Josh chose to have turkey leg. It was good!

Ueno Park Tokyo

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo
Another temple that doesn’t have devotees.

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

Unlike in Manila and other parts of the Philippines, street beggars in Tokyo appear clean and well-poised. Straight body si kuya.

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo
A Koreanovela effect under the cherry blossoms.

Ueno Park Tokyo

Ueno Park Tokyo

Ueno Park Tokyo

All of a sudden grumpy kid.

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo

Picnic blankets were occupied by locals, and they drink! It is legal here! How come there are no police around. Japanese people must be very good in composing themselves even when drunk.

Ueno Park and Zoo, Tokyo
Lovely HHWW (holding hand while walking) couple. Their outfit matched!

You can also read my Tour with Cherry Blossoms at Ueno Park and Zoo Part II (soon)

Ueno Park and Zoo Tour Information: How to Get to Ueno Park and Zoo

Ueno Park is just next to JR Ueno Station. You can ride any Major JR Lines in Central Tokyo, and look for Ueno Station. Look for “Park Exit” sign once arrived in Ueno Station.

Photos were from 2012 Spring.



About Ada

Ada Wilkinson of adaphobic.com

My name is Ada, an old-fashioned, curly, jumper, wanderlust, who enjoys budget and DIY traveling.

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